Miss Lone Star is a 37’ twin-engine boat with a crew of five. Parents, two kids and one large German Sheppard service dog. We live aboard her full-time and use her 128 sf. of interior room to it’s full potential. We once lived in Austin, TX but we sold everything we owned to pursue our dream of living on the sea. This is our Caribbean Travel Blog. One day we may venture across the Pacific and Atlantic but we will need a bigger vessel!

We wanted to explore and disconnect from most parts of society. Our friends and family told us we were crazy. We knew living in suburbia wasn’t for us. We owned a boat class A rated ocean rated vessel on a lake and we felt could take us on our journey and the rest is history. We had zero sea experience.

It was a big adjustment and we’ve had some scary experiences. We love our liveaboard lifestyle. We homeschool our kids and we live like locals everywhere we go. We live modestly and don’t worry less. We traded possessions for experiences. Thank you for reading our blog and please take a moment to look at our Meet The Crew and Support Us sections for more about our journey!

Sailing Our First 250 Miles- What We Learned

Learning to sail- the basics

By now, everyone knows that we are novice sailors.  The learning curve is steep in sailing and it has been putting us to the the test.  I have learned that some lessons can be learned by reading stories, books, etc. but most of the lessons of sailing have to be learned by experience, most notably my mistakes.

I will never forget setting off from Royal River Boatyard in Yarmouth Maine.  We were in the river channel and I pushed in the clutch button to the motor as I shifted it to forward.  I only heard the engine rev up and we didn’t go forward, needless to say.  That was a quick and painless fix.  We motored for a few miles and I kicked up the RPM’s to about 1500.  The boat seemed to be going alone nicely.  I was looking around a little too much at all of the wonder that was motor sailing and I got out of the tight channel.  I felt the keel bog down and the wheel shot over to the starboard side through my light grip.  Instinctively, I turned to port and increased the PRM’s.  Obviously, we were in too shallow water and Miss Lone Star was dragging on some soft mud.  The boat was right in just a few seconds.  Aubrey asked, “what happened?”  I replied, “nothing” but we both knew what had just happened.  I may try to lie to my wife but she always knows.  I remember one of her narrations from our films,

read more

10 comments.

Why Support Miss Lone Star On Patreon?

Patreon

In the beginning, we started this blog and our YouTube channel so that our family and friends could follow us on our journey.  We knew that we were embarking on a once in a lifetime journey and we also wanted to document it for ourselves.  I value research and I was surprised that there weren’t that many comprehensive blogs that explained how people had actually sold it all and sailed away.  Most of what I discovered was a happy version of people who always looked competent and never made a mistake.  Our YouTube videos looked more like home videos.

read more

0 comments.

Aubrey Has Completed Her First 1 Hour Documentary!

D94A9282

I am so proud of my wife for putting together our best video yet, in the form of a 1 hour documentary about our experience on Jewel Island, Maine.  We loved the island, despite it being rumored to be haunted and a pirate haven for hundreds of years.  We explored all it had to offer before returning to our boat to sleep at anchor for the first night.  We awoke to find the boat closer to shore and running aground!  The tide went out and it beached itself over a couple hours.  It got much worse before it ever got better and we almost lost the boat.  Enjoy the film and please leave a comment below.

read more

0 comments.

Our Logistics of Sailing

sailing is complicated

For us, boating has never been uncomplicated.  Most people think that you just untie the lines and sail away to an exotic beach.  It doesn’t always happen that way.  Recently, we had to work out a lot of logistics that would allow to continue living the life we want to live.  We get a lot of questions from readers/viewers asking how we work out all of the small details and this post will serve to address some of those comments. Some of the logistics are small but nonetheless they need to be worked out.

read more

8 comments.

What Is It Like To Sink Your Boat?

what is it like to sink your boat

We had been at the boatyard in Yarmouth for about three weeks and things were all too comfortable.  We met a large number of friends in the area and we were all warm and comfy on our sailboat that was tied securely to the dock.  If something went wrong, I had plenty of time to fix it and I had a truck that I could borrow to go get the appropriate part if it wasn’t to be had in Royal River.  It snowed over six inches as we were preparing to leave so we delayed it another day.  I could feel the moss growing on my feet and I feared that we might never leave unless I untied the lines and set all fear aside.

read more

70 comments.

All Weathermen Are Liars

sailing miss lone starWe made it into Newport, RI on a cold, cloudy day after 200 miles of sailing and motor sailing.  We had already come through some rough and very cold weather since we departed Yarmouth, ME.  We arrived and tied up temporarily on a dock because we couldn’t find fuel.  It was Sunday and nothing was open.  We were greeted by our friends Chet and Michelle who drove down from Massachusetts to visit.  Our friend Phil had continued with us from Portland to Newport to raise our spirits after our first sailing mishap.

read more

17 comments.

The Cold Kicked Our Ass!

IMG_9592

We knew we would be in for it when we left our warm Florida Keys location and traded it in for Maine in April, but we had no way to know how chilled we would get.  We got off the plane in Boston and we already needed a jacket.  A short drive to Maine made us wish we had ski gear and a huge umbrella.  We had neither.  We lived in the sky boat for a week and we thought that was cold until it snowed 6 inches the day before we were to depart.

We set off on the open water and there was still a build up of snow on the side of our rails.  The temperature outside was said to be fifty before we got into the open water and the windchill till it down to the high 30’s.  People thought we were crazy to be on the ocean in April and we didn’t see many boats as we made it south from Jewel Island to Portland.  We made it about forty five miles south to the Isla of the Shoals and it was still brisk and or freezing, depending on how you categorize cold.  The next day we made it one hundred miles and I am pretty sure that I lost feeling in my toes for several hours as we ventured south to Cuttyhunk, MA.  The next morning was, you guessed it, frozen and we sailed on to Newport, RI.  It stopped raining long enough for us to get into the dinghy and head for town.  Once we got into the dinghy it started raining again.

read more

8 comments.

It’s Official- We Are Sailors!

IMG_9249

It was warm and sticky when we moved Miss Lone Star 1.0 from Smuggler’s Cove in Islamorada to a safe place.  The mangroves played tricks with my find (and eyes) for one of the last times.  I was sad when we tied the lines for the last time and we anticipated being back in 4-6 weeks (at the time).  We loaded up into a cab that transported us and our 500 lbs. of gear to the airport.  We rushed to catch our plane and we almost missed it.

We arrived in Boston and our friend Chet picked us up.  It was cold, gray and raining.  He said that 50 mile an hour winds were called for later that day and we got on the road towards Maine.  Aubrey had been to 6 total states through this time in her life and added another 3 by the time we got to Yarmouth and our new sailboat, Miss Lone Star 2.0.IMG_8979

read more

4 comments.

I’ll Throw You Over This Rail!

Marina Life in the Florida Keys

“I’ll throw your ass over this rail,” I heard as I came to in in a hazy fog at 2 A.M.  “I’m going to get a gun,” was announced next.  I heard a woman scream and I also heard Aubrey telling me to call the cops because some lady was about to get killed.  I dialed 911 and explained the circumstances.  The dispatcher informed me that the police were on the way.  Aubrey and I gazed out our top hatch at a fight that was still ensuing on the balcony across from where our boat was docked.

read more

2 comments.

A Closer Look

D94A8872

The Vastness in what lies just below the water’s surface always captures my imagination.  I look forward to the days when the wind blows the blades of seagrass  in from the reef, creating an amazing estuary of tiny life right at my feet. Most people just don’t notice, or care to take the time to take a closer look. I am often scolded for not ‘leaving nature alone’, but if I listened to others my children and I would never know that the scales of a triggerfish feel like an emery board or a pufferfish feels just like a frog.  I believe that part of respecting nature, is really understanding it in a way that cannot be learned from a book. I want Blake and Bianca to grow up fearlessly learning about the world around them. I try to lead by example. So for all of you that have shouted from the rooftops “AMIMAL ABUSER”, I am raising the next great scientist that are learning to love the world they live in by having the chance to reach out and touch it.

read more

1 comment.

Miss Lone Star is a 37’ twin-engine boat with a crew of five. Parents, two kids and one large German Sheppard service dog. We live aboard her full-time and use her 128 sf. of interior room to it’s full potential. We once lived in Austin, TX but we sold everything we owned to pursue our dream of living on the sea. This is our Caribbean Travel Blog. One day we may venture across the Pacific and Atlantic but we will need a bigger vessel!

We wanted to explore and disconnect from most parts of society. Our friends and family told us we were crazy. We knew living in suburbia wasn’t for us. We owned a boat class A rated ocean rated vessel on a lake and we felt could take us on our journey and the rest is history. We had zero sea experience.

It was a big adjustment and we’ve had some scary experiences. We love our liveaboard lifestyle. We homeschool our kids and we live like locals everywhere we go. We live modestly and don’t worry less. We traded possessions for experiences. Thank you for reading our blog and please take a moment to look at our Meet The Crew and Support Us sections for more about our journey!